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THB HOUSE OF DREAMS. 



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1 

1 






Copyright, 1899, by 
WilUam Griffith. 



v/7 
3 



<^ DEDICATION. 

\_ 

m 

\ AS the earth to its Maker 

2 /A Gives back His own making, 

• 

1^ The rose to its taker 

Resigns its own taking; 
As the scroll to its reader 

Reveals his own knowing, 
The field to its seeder 

Returns his own sowing; 
As the mine undiscovered 

Holds gems only known to it, 
The mirror uncovered 

Reflects what is shown to it; 
As the music its sweetness 

To. its seeker gives pleasure, 
Or as Song by its fleetness 

Concealing its treasure. 
To the loves of all loving 

The love of the Nine is 
As the most of my having 

To its havers here mine is. 



DEDICATION. 

If the breath of all breathing 
Be the life of all living — 

And if Love thus bequeathing 
Can get aught for its giving, 

dear, mystical Mother! 

To the Sun, nested, swinging, 

1 bear nothing other 

Than songs of thy singing. 



VI 



CONTENTS. 

Dedication v 

The House of Dreams 3 

SONGS OP THE WORLD. 

A Litany of the Nations 17 

The Blind Organ-Grinder 24 

ITINERARY. 

Wayfarers 88 

Tramping 88 

The Wanderer 44 

The Vagabond 62 

finest 56 

Reqniescat 67 

LYRICS. 

Dream of the Hills 61 

The Evening Primrose 64 

The Daffodil 66 



Vll 



CONTENTS. 



SONGS OP HOPB. 

71 

72 
73 

74 
75 
76 



I 




II 


v.- 


in 


IV 


V 


VI -- 




SEA SONGS. 




Ill 



79 
80 
81 



CAPRICBS. 

Oberon and Titania (Masque) 85 

T he Sisters 100 

An Umbel for Spring 102 

Inscription 105 



viu 



THE HOUSE 

OF 

DREAMS. 



f^^mmm^mm'^^'mf^mm 



A 



THE HOUSE OF DREAMS. 
To Charles G. D. Roberts. 

N azure dome of trailing galaxies 
Way over hills and plains and seas, 
Here in a world of dreams 
The old house seems 



So much like home at times, though never grown 
Familiar really. Alone 
On my monotonous way 
From day to day 

I wander through the rooms, across the floors 
Of multitudinous corridors 
Adorned with tapestries 
No mortal eyes 



3 



THE HOUSE OF DREAMS. 

On earth may ever fathom awelessly; 

So marvelous they are to see, 

With sceneries, designed 
Ages behind 

With overshadowing, terrestrial 
Precipices where rivers fall 
Obediently below, 
Or great winds blow 

Dark argosies of clouds above the deep 
Blue seas as muttering thunders leap 
Roaring ere the cowed main 
Subsides again. 

Ephemeral beings also seem to move 
Or pause as if some Spirit wove 
Them in a vision. So 
Few seem to know 



4 



THE HOUSE OF DREAMS. 



Or realize there are more purposes 
Of excellence than to possess 
Materially the dross 
Of gain and loss. 

Withal, an audience of cheering hope 
Engrossed among themselves, they grope 
In search of hidden lore 
Fore ver more; 

While some, with shuddering, despairing ways 
Of hopelessness, about them gaze 
Bewildered, speechless. There 
Is such an air 

Of mystery surrounding everything; 
So many voices whispering 
Of meanings weird and strange 
Beyond the range 



THE HOUSE OF DREAMS. 

Or reach of human utterance. There are 
Dear forms and faces waiting far 
Away, but not above 
The will of love. 

Alluring as the miracle appears 
On musing, more than twenty years 
Companioning as thralls; 
At intervals 

Emerging from my doorway, in the sun 
Of many a drowsy afternoon 
Or morning soft and warm 
With Spring, they swarm 

In multitudes along the thoroughfares, 
Oblivious that each phantom wears 
His cowl as though afraid 
The masquerade 



6 



THE HOUSE OF DREAMS. 

Were ineffectual or otherwise 
Bewildering discerning eyes 
With revelations more 
Revered of yore. 

Day after day while men and women pass 
Me clustering together as 
If fearful to intrude 
On solitude 

Asunder (mortals really appear 
So comfortable on more near 
Acquaintance) I believe 
They never grieve 

Or have real sorrows of the soul. A few, 
More knowing, seem as if they knew 
Them foolish who complain 
That all is vain: 



■i 



THE HOUSE OF DREAMS. 

While, strange to say, not one of them but strives 
Indomitably a while, and thrives 
Or wanders from the quest, 
As may be best 

Of all when all is over — everyone, 
Of course, whether with duty done 
Or with remorseful end. 
Will comprehend. 

Sometimes with the unanimous appeal 
Of faces showing me the real 
Truth of themselves, I walk 
With them and talk 

On business or comfortable things 
Of human interest. It wrings 
My wondering soul to learn 
How much they yearn 



8 



.«' 



\^\' . • ' - r; .T 



THE HOUSE OF DREAMS. 

With wistful eyes for something on obscure 
Horizons over hills that lure 
All mortals on with views 
Illuminous 

With Paradisal mirages away 
Beyond my caravanserai 
Immuring everyone 
Under the sun 

Beneath impenetrable mazes. Most 
Of all I marvel where my Host, 
As Ghibelline or Guelf, 
May house Himself 

Among us on the premises — always 
Evading my inquiring gaze 
Effectually and dense 
As reticence 



9 



THE HOUSE OF DREAMS. 

• 

Regarding whomsoever may profess 
To know immortal messages, 
Bearing the signature 
Of Heaven, lure 

The simple and the curious. It seems 
There are innumerable themes 
Becoming obvious 
Enough to us 

Who raise the awful tapestries. We cower 
Amazed and terrified when our 
Own mortal Visage looms 
Up in the rooms 

Yonder disclosing the ineffable, 
Self-same, illuminating, well 
Known features with the wise, 
Sad human eyes 



10 



THE HOUSE OF DREAMS. 

* 

On fire with smouldering meanings full of wild 
Desires commingling with the mild, 
Harmless reproaches of 
Enduring love. 

Albeit maddening demons haunt the place 
So ominously, not a trace 
Does wall or door reveal 
Of all that steal 

In, time to time, with voices summoning 
Belated hosts whose harrowing 
Reverberations roll 
Around my soul. 

Mumbling and daft and crazing as the moan 
Or plangent sobbing of some lone. 
Unfathomable sea 
Alluring me 



11 



THE HOUSE OF DREAMS. 

Away from all my fellows — day and night 
Urging and mastering despite 
The most unyielding lust 
• Bom of the dust. 

Whenever death may choose to terminate 
Our joyous intercourse and wait 
On mortals evermore 
Beyond my door, 

Just during some calm evening may the voice 
Of Nature, bidding all rejoice 
In wilding beauty, be 
The call for me 

On the eternal hills with stars and breeze 
In fellowship, becoming these 
Same forms as they have been 
Or known or seen 



12 



THE HOUSE OF DREAMS. 

The vast infinitude wherein must be 
Once more a hazy memofy 
Of glimmering chambers trod 
Alone with God. 



13 



SONGS 

OF 

THE WORI^D. 



. i 



ww^^^^^^^m^^H^WK^l^^i^^mm^m^mt^i^^mmtfm iuhmu ■«■ ' '" '^ 



A LITANY OF THE NATIONS. 

The nations shall rusk like ike rusking 
of many waters .... and skall be chased 
before tke Tvind. Isaiah XVII. 18. 

GREECE. 

A THOUSAND aeons wandered down the seas, 
And at one great, immortal voice,* the sweet 
Tranquility of marching silences 
Was broken at my feet. 

Motker of Nations y as of yore 
Renumber us and^ near us 
Beseeching Tkee for evermore y 
Heary O kear us! 

*Homer. 

17 



THE HOUSE OP DREAMS. 

ITALY. 

A Janus form and still a spheral bride 

With steadfast eyes set toward Rome's glories 
gone, 
Afar I clomb and wept and hailed my wide, 

Reincarnated dawn. 

Mother of Nations y as of yore 
Remember tis andy near us 
Beseeching Thee for evermore ^ 
Hear^ O hear us! 

FRANCE. 
Vine-clad, imperial, majestic — save 
Gay mediaeval heroes of romance, 
Orion wheeleth over whom more brave. 
More beautiful than France! 

Mother of Nations y as of yore 
Remember us and, near us 

Beseeching Thee for evermore^ 
Hear, O hear us! 



18 



SONGS OF THE WORLD. 

SPAIN. 

A world between my hands, down south the Line 

Rode galleons abroad, and from the prize 
I laid Golconda at her golden shrine 
And worshiped Avarice. 

Mother of Nations ^ as of yore 
Remember us and^ near us 
Beseeching Thee for evermore. 
Hear, O hear us! 

SWITZERLAND. 

From mountains crowned with freedom, I repeat 
The skies' great secret. Time's eternal quest, 
Above the nations thundering at my feet — 
And overlook the West. 

Mother of Nations , as of yore 
Remember us and, near us 
Beseeching Thee for evermore. 
Hear, O hear us! 



19 



THE HOUSE OF DREAMS. 

GERMANY. 

Antiphonal and broadcast, as of yore, 

Adown Saharan wastes, from shoreless seas 
Of wildest, rippling dulcitude, I pour 
Earth-flooding harmonies. 

Mother of Nations^ as of yore 
Remember us andy near us 
Beseeching Thee for evermore, 
Hear, O hear us! 

RUSSIA. 

All Winters come and all the Summers go. 
And all the starry watchmen sally forth 
Above yon thousand hills where waiteth — lo! 
The Warden of the North. 

Mother of Nations y as of yore 
Remember us and, near us 
Beseeching Thee for evermore , 
Heary O hear us! 



20 



SONGS OF THE WORLD. 

GREAT BRITAIN. 

Far-flung and overstrown, by British sails, 

With border-fringing colonies — unfurled 

And spread from my broad shoulders — downward 
trails 

The raiment of the world. 

Mother of Nations y as of yore 
Remember us and, near us 
Beseeching Thee for evermore y 
Heary O hear usf 

AMERICA. 

Westward, O westward still all empire goes! 

And westward where the cosmic balance lies 
High on my palm, the splendid Future glows 
Forever in my eyes. 

Mother of Nations y as of yore 
Remember us andy near us 
Beseeching Thee for evermore y 
Heary O hear us/ 



21 



THE HOUSE OF DREAMS. 

JAPAN. 

Amid the warring peoples I, that slept 

And dreamed of wide dominion — confident, 
Ambitious, urging and sublime — have stept 
Out from the Orient. 

Mother of Nations, as of yore 
Remember us and, near us 
Beseeching Thee for evermore, 
Hear^ O hear us! 

CHINA. 

August, majestic, hapless, overrun 

By crowding multitudes, and still elate 
With Time behind, above me moves the Sun, 
Oblivion and Fate. 

Mother of Nations, as of yore 

Remember us and, near us 
Beseeching Thee forevermore, 
Hear, O hear usf 



22 



' ' »» w « > >w « ■ -jwi 91 V I pi J qp mm ■"-iiP'vav^'-iV^p^^^WaviP'^PVHMi^iVI^HPPi'WPV'miaiMiimiViq 



SONGS OF THE WORI.D. 

TURKEY. 

Over the Orient a trumpet peals 

From Heaven, reverberating on the sweet, 
Cold, shuddering starlight as a nation kneels 
For mercy at Thy feet. 

Mother of Nations ^ as of yore 
Remember us and^ near us 
Beseeching Thee for evermore, 
Hear, still hear us! 



23 



' I ' ■ •.^T'-.'^. I -• 



THE BUND ORGAN-GRINDER. 

A Ballad, 

A thousand ways the millions toiled — 
And still throughout the land, elate 

With whetted fangs, the factions coiled 
Around a pallid State. 

The Winters came; the Summers went ; 

The wan stars fled before the sun; 
The bow of darkness still was bent; 

The nations thundered on; 

And Spring, in happy, sweet amaze, 
Still as of yore, her cheeks impearled, 

Spread like a carpet for the days, 
The beauty of the world: 



24 



PHP 






SONGS OF THE WORI.D. 

While night by night, now dim descried 

In galaxies — a starried zone, 
The smouldering cities, far and wide, 

lyike constellations shone. 

Wherein begrimed from year to year. 
With warring souls amid the slime. 

Men herded through the stre^ets to hear 
The heaving anvils chime. 

Lawyers and workmen — ^slaves of Fate, 
With beggars, harlots, wives — a proud. 

Majestic, surging, squalid, great 
And many-featured crowd. 

For this was even such a time. 
With men unholy, women bold. 

As once in that far eastern clime. 
The prophet had foretold: 



25 



THE HOUSE OP DREAMS. 

When rich and poor alike, grown lewd, 
With brazen scorn upheld above 

All else, all vice — defiling good 
As mockers of sweet love. 

And on the masses surged and swayed 
Adown the night with pulsing feet, 

Where some forgotten beggar played 
An organ of the street 

Close to the curb, unnoticed save 

By one companion at his side; 
His little daughter, poor and brave: 

"A penny, please !" — ^she cried. 

**A penny, please!'* — ^The crowd moved on 
Heedless of that weak, piteous cry; 

They had no time for such, and none 
Had ears for charity. 



26 



SONGS OF THE WORI^D. 

The day at last swept through the dawn; 

The twilight lilies, one by one, 

Faded around the stars — the lone 
Outriders of the sun, 

While morn set in; the beggar still 
Turned out his doleful organ tune; 

Hungry and blind he toiled until 
The slow sun stood at noon. 

When lo! within his ear a faint, 
Approaching, dulcet harmony 

Began with allegrettos quaint 
As of some melody 

Lost in a wilderness of far, 
Melodious oboes keen and strong, 

Wherein one lone, belated star 
Had broken into song. 



27 



THE HOUSE OP DREAMS. 

The day wore on; the twilight lowered; 

Again night came, and still in sweet 
Orchestral strains the music poured 

Its marvel through the street. 

Starvation stared athwart the gloom : 
The beggar, stranger to a meal, 

Hastened to meet his awful doom 
With one last wild appeal — 



• • • • 



"O Father, Father God, here take 

Here take me! Daughter, come,** — ^he said. 

Dread silence reigned. Starved, starved! 
Christ's sake! 
The little girl was dead. 

Straightway from Heaven a cloud was lowered 
Above that strange, majestic throng; 

From aching flutes archangels poured 
Sweet music full and strong. 



28 



SONGS OF THE WORI.D. 

Someone approached the sleeping pair: 
All Heaven drew nigh — a galaxy 

Of radiant eyes with faces there 
Beneficent to see. 

"Come," said the Stranger, "now arise; 

The seraphim await you here!" 
Then fell, he knew not, from Those eyes, 

A diamond or a tear. 

lyO, straight at Heaven's gate they stood! 

God led them in; the angels sang; 
Like sweet bells chiming through the blood, 

The echoes softly rang. 

Whence looking out far down below 
The systems whirled, while far away, 

A crimson, driving flake of snow, 
The earth stood back to day. 



29 



THE HOUSE OF DREAMS. 

And Winters come while Summers go; 

The wan stars flee before the sun; 
The Night yet bends her darkened bow; 

The nations thunder on; 

While still in happy, sweet amaze, 
The Spring, her rosy cheeks impearled, 

Spreads like a carpet for the days, 
The beauty of the world. 



80 



ITINERARY. 



. * 



« 1 - » - 



A 



WAYFARERS. 

COMPANY we are of queer, 
Masked wanderers who here 

Carouse 
In our wide house; 



Arriving ever since the prime 
With multitudes who climb 
Its stair — 
Say, ah, say where! 

Whether as guests or captives who 
Do angels but pursue ; 
Of heaven 
At birth bereaven. 



33 



THE HOUSE OF DREAMS. 

All who are fleeing from the grace 
Of yonder pitying Face 
You shun, 
What have you done? 

As buds afar, ere blossoming, 
As flowers, ere reaching Spring, 
May know 
Some prescient woe, 

Awaiting final ministries 
We revelers, ill at ease, 
Attend 
The gradual end. 

A wanderer beneath the sun 
Himself remembers one 
Who viewed 
The multitude. 



34 



ITINERARY. 

Albeit he was hopelessly 
Misjudged and never free 
From strife, 
He lived his life. 

So far from Paradise removed, 
On earth his spirit roved 
The well 
Scorched paths of hell, 

Unnoted even while, endued 
With penitence, he sued 
Those wise, 
Averted eyes. 

Alas ! how far away his call 
For mercy, knowing all 
Would be 
A mystery 



86 



THE HOUSE OF DREAMS. 

Of holier divining, yet 
Unable to forget 
The fears 
Of many years; 

Believing never mortal spirit 
Intended to inherit 
A lone 
Oblivion. 

Oblivion— -unwilling Will 
Outbreathing from the still, 
Vague stress 
Of consciousness. 

Whereover at One postern light 
When, roving that long night 
Abroad, 
Far on the road — 



36 



ITINERARY. 

Some calm, lone, summer morning we 
World-wanderers may be 
Returned one company 

Of yore, 
At Home once more. 



37 



o 



TRAMPING. 

Children of Nature waitings all 
Expectant of Her certain call 

For J4S, Tve loiter at the heart 
Of Summer — ready to depart. 

VBR the hills from the justle and press 
Of the aching and hollow weariness. 



With the heart of a child once more, and free 
As the joyous voice of the sun to the sea, 

Leaving the world behind, with its cares 
Thronging the busy thoroughfares 



38 



ITINERARY. 



All day long where disguises harass 
A soul, we wave and whistle and pass 

Over the bridges, out through the broad 
Gates of the Summer and down the road. 

Merry as gypsies following one 
Hope in the distance beckoning on 

Illusively as a soul endued 

With the calm, mysterious solitude 

More glorious because of a word 
Of wonder filling the song of a bird. 

We are away with the daffodils 

On the myriad trail of a thousand hills. 

Climbing many a sloping lawn 
Skyward over the valleys, on 



39 



THE HOUSE OF DREAMS. 



The summits lingering to gaze 
Over the billowy leagues of maize 

Waving miles away and far 
As the calling waters are 

Bidding us explore the rude, 
Joyous freedom of the wood. 

A warbling chorus overhead 
Of rapturous voices, and a bed 

Down in the valley where a flush 
Of glory mantles the underbrush 

Of dewy leaves. O leaves and dew, 
We are but wanderers with you 

Dear sharers of ephemeral 
Mortality that, during all 



40 



ITINERARY. 



The trampling marches of the rain, 
AwakenS) wanes and sleeps again ! 

A glimpse of sorrow while we press 
On exploring the wilderness 

Of regions never known to tire 
Out the wandering desire; 

Garrulous as idle leaves 
Gossiping on Summer eves 

Over the forest, over the lone 
Avenues in a monotone. 

Miles on miles of forests ere 
Wearying voices of the air 

Summon us as comrades bent 

On sharing the same commodious tent 



41 



THE HOUSE OF DREAMS. 



Of darkness starrily pitched at night 
By the wandering waters of delight. 

Heaven glimmering in between 
The rustling foliage of green 

Above us chiming merry tales 
Around the camp-fires in the vales. 

All night dreaming of the shrill 
Whistles of the whip-poor-will 

In the wilderness, as they 
Of the comrade spirit may 

Only who must breast the chance 
Blows of passing circumstance. 

Able from our souls to lend 
The word of courage to a friend 



42 



ITINERARY. 



Or a brother who must face 
Being with the commonplace; 

Over hills and woods and streams, 
Whistling down the road of dreams 

Evermore, we journey as 
Comrades going home who pass 

Waving fellows of the sod 
In the company of God. 



43 



THE WANDERER. 

I loaf and invite my Saul . . . 
Haw curious! Haw real! 
Underfoot the divine soil — Overhead 
the sun!— Waix Whitman. 

A COMFORTABLE fellow, poor 
As he appears 
Withal, and I have known him more 
Than twenty years 

To seem so reticently wise 

With mortals, save 
For such interrogating eyes. 

Rivals the grave. 



44 



ITINERARY. 

And evermore awaiting news, 

Day in and out 
Across the busy avenues, 

Wanders about 

Soliciting a word or two, 

Or just the hand 
Of some old crony passing — you 

May understand 

That heavy touch of loneliness 
Acknowledged when 

Amid the shouting and the press 
Of many men. 

They say an oddity and yet. 

With fewer dimes 
Than pockets even, I have met 

Him oftentimes 



46 



THE HOUSE OF DREAMS. 

Recklessly squandering every cent 

That he was worth, 
On some slack-coated mendicant 

Of Mother earth, 

Repenting leisurely. I ween 

Another ell 
For his own covering had been 

Acceptable. 

And while oblivious of that 

Inquiring gaze 
Occasioning such glances at 

His funny ways, 

Reveres existence, thinking less 

Of ways and woes 
Than yonder millionaires who bless 

Mammon, and goes ' 



46 



ITINERARY. 

On bankrupting description so 

Completely through 
The spacious thoroughfares as though 

He never knew, 

On all the earth, apparently, 

Another home 
Commodious as having free 

Expanse to roam. 

An alien and waif who seems 

So far away 
From all the customary themes 

Of every day; 

Appearing usually above 

Familiar 

Surroundings as acquaintance of 
Another star 



47 



THE HOUSE OF DREAMS. 

I dare believe, or intimate 

With more than one 
Of yonder pensioners that wait 

Upon the sun 

All Summer in the retinue 

Of frontier flowers 
That vanish only to pursue 

The racing hours. 

Outlandish, upper story? Well, 

Of all the muss 
And trumpery men ever tell 

Of, curious 

Old fashions from the cloisters brought 

Beneath his hat 
And cupboarded forever — not 

A word of that 



48 



ITINERARY. 

To any one, or I shall be 

Constrained to share 
Reproving consequences — see 

That shadow there 

Beyond my table, moving out 

Across the floor 
At intervals. Someone about 

The corridor 

Eavesdropping probably; these rooms 

Hear everything 
Above the slightest whisper — comes 

Of gossiping 

Of course, and so as quietly 

As possible 
Another moment! On a spree, 

The neighbors tell 



49 



THE HOUSE OF DREAMS. 

Each other, preferably he roves 

Across the blue 
Ranges of Autumn often — loves 

The people too 

And idolizes children as 

A wanderer 
Kinsman fallowing with the grass, 

Can well aver; 

Albeit not another knows 

Him really 
Beyond appearances, so close 

And quiet he 

Arranges matters that some day, 

When April fills 
The world with glory, he will stray 

Over the hills 



50 



ITINERARY, 



Far down across the Summer, hand 

In hand alone, 
Once more, with Nature's children and 
[ Just be as one 



Incorporeal with the dews 
Of sties and breeze, 

Wayfaring on the avenues 
Of dreams and peace. 



61 



THE VAGABOND. 

A 1,1, day at ease, from street to street 
I stroll about the town; 
Sometimes with scarce enough to eat, 

While sometimes, up and down 
Upon my face, the passers trace 
A dislocated frown: 

For one thus roving through the land 
With Hunger playing wife, 

Begins right ofiF to understand. 
While dancing to the fife, 

The comedy, the greatness and 
The littleness of life. 



62 



ITINERARY, 

My clothes may claim to be akin 
To cousin-german shreds, 

For often chalkily the skin 

Peers through the latticed threads; 

But when a man begins to plan 
And hum and haw, he weds 



An inconvenient, shrewish Fat 
Tell them for me — and Pride, 

In masquerade, is but a late 
Collector who must ride 

Unrecompensed from gate to gate 
Where gentlemen reside. 

Once long ago it was my luck 

Or fortune, as you leave, 
By stumbling over I^ove to pluck 

Some devil by the sleeve; 
Whence through a dame my purse became 

The double of a sieve. 



53 



THE HOUSE OF DREAMS. 

Wherefore I took me to the last 

Resort of poverty; 
Compelled to break a gnawing fast 

Or starve, one night when she, 
My love, lay sick — I choked the past, 

With Hell drawn nigh to see 

A man defying God. I stole; 

To save a wife — to save 
The only one in all this whole 

Creation who forgave 
The little sin of Nature in 

A conscientious slave. 

But well I know a storm is more 
Than many think they raise; 

That there is many another poor. 
Forgotten devil pays 

Some ferry-fare to carry o'er 
The marks of other days. 



54 



ITINERARY. 

So, while the moments slip and slide 

From Winter into Spring, 
With hedges flushing either side 

The country lanes, I bring 
Across the mart a foolish heart 

To hear the finches sing 

Of gypsy joys beyond the town; 

Where daisies climb the scars 
All Summer from the shouts that drown 

The birds — ^their happy bars; 
The while I wave and pass far down 

Beneath the silent stars. 



55 



QUEST. 

AMONG the daisies of the lanes. 
Oblivious of all merciless 
Desires, a rover on the plains 
Of Beanty sought for happiness 



A little hour or so — and tears 
Fell on the branches of the tree 

Where he had plucked the petaled years, 
As fewer grew the days to be. ' 



The shrill and aching tears became * j 

As quenching dew beneath the sun; ' 

And happiness was but the same 
Old hope that better would be done. 



56 



» •. • •» 



REQUIESCAT. 

Comrades^ 

A FOREST of weary days 
We explore — but O why gaze 
Or point where a vanished face 
Passed over the sundown rills, 

When the blue-bird voices sing 
That all chance remembering 
Must be as a migrant Spring — 
And a hunter gone from the hills? 



67 



i 



r 



LYRICS. 



DREAM OF THE HII.I,S. 

A DREAMER worn with many dreams 
Of weariness, borne in to me 
Unsummoned, subtler than the themes 
Impassioning the sea 

Melodiously, some lyric note 

Or something whispered by the breeze, 
Drives my heart welling to my throat 

With old-time memories 

Of harvest-homes and fair demesnes 
With all the meadow-farms, and O 

Across the hills, familiar scenes 
And faces long ago! 



61 



THE HOUSE OF DREAMS. 

I/), lo — a waft of magic wands! 

The city fades away; bedight 
With miles of shade, the orchard lands 

Sweep slowly into sight: 

As far off past the little town 

And highways flushed with happy rainS) 
My aimless footsteps idle down 

The quiet Summer lanes. 

I see the woods; I hear the quail's 
Wild whistles where the placid rills 

Plow down forever by the dales 
And cattle on the hills. 

A sloping ridge; with shaded eyes 
Above the waving fields of hay 

Below me, only sunny skies 
And reapers far away. 

02 



LYRICS. 

And faint winds whisper here and there, 
And something passes in the breeze 

Beyond all thoughts, and thrills the air 
With dewy memories 

Of old-time haunts and fair demesnes 
With thriving meadow-farms, and O 

Across the hills, familiar scenes 
And faces long ago! 



63 



THE EVENING PRIMROSE. 

THE earliest lark had climbed to meet 
The sun, and though the Forest swept 
Her rustling skirts o'er vanished feet, 

The light prints told where Morning stept; 

While sifted through the bashful gloom, 
The soft daylight fell pink and fair; 

The world was all one rosy bloom 
With mantling blushes in the air. 

For O a beauteous sisterhood 
Of blossoms there together grew — 

And there a little primrose stood 
As Nature drew her curtains to! 



64 



LYRICS. 

She dreamed her dreams, and never gazed 

Beyond her little curtain fold, 
Before the Twilight came and raised 

For me a little face of gold. 

Although it was a little face 
And but a primrose Time had. sown, 

None other saw her shyly raise 
The beauty that was mine alone. 

And somewhere, if I only see 

In passing, dropped from hour to hour 
Down through the years, Love has for me 

A little flower, a little flower. 



65 



THE DAFFODIL. 

A TRAMP of hoofs, one steady beat 
Of heavy wagons through the street 
All day — and still, 
Here in the dnst a little sweet 
Spring daffodil 

Lies trampled under, roughly tom; 
No more so gladly to adorn 

Or O to raise, 
With sister blossoms to the mom. 

An eager face! 

The woodland waters shall relate 
Thy tender graciousness, and wait 

Amid the fern, 
Oblivious, laughingly, of Fate, 

Some rare return : 



66 



LYRICS. 

While unremembered here and blown 
Along the way; neglected, grown 

So sorely flushed 
And withered now, thou art alone, 

Forgotten, crushed. 

The dew just lingers as a dear 
Remembrance where some angel tear 

Was suffered start. 
Did someone injure Nature here 

And break her heart? 



67 



SONGS 
OF 
HOPE. 



r 



I. 



WAYFARING onward ever 
From dream to dream, we stray 
Into the morrow country, 
Out of the yesterday 

Of all remembrance, leaving 

The frontiers of distress 
Behind where some divinely 

Beckoning happiness, 

Over the dawning moment 

Of darkness, shall fulfill 
The great dream of the daring, 

Indomitable Will. 



71 



THE HOUSE OF DREAMS. 



II. 



LORD of the sun's blue-domed pavilion ; 
Now in the heart of the whole world 
over, 
Grant, O grant for a toiling million. 

The wistful wish of a jocund rover! 



Grant Thou and give unto whom belongs, 
When the dream of a perfect day departs, 

An urging joy for a thousand songs — 
With the song of Hope for a thousand hearts. 



72 



s- 






SONGS OF HOPE. 



III. 

THE world has slowly beckoned ; 
The time — the time has come ; 
Once more we say farewell 
In the little Western home. 

Once more the old hills vanish; 

The faces all retire 
Once more, and Hope seems only 

The urgence of desire. 



78 



THE HOUSE OP DREAMS. 



IV. 

HOPE, in Its dominance, may part 
Or raise the heavy lids of day; 
Ivove, under sentence of delay, 
Brings sickness to the heart. 

And somewhere filled with ecstasy, 
While your hand touches mine, a chant 
Rises melodious, resonant — 

O like a caUing sea! 



74 



SONGS OF HOPE. 



V. 



ALONE have you come, and to me 
You have brought through the silent night 
One Hope for the dream and a bright 
Sun-touch for its memory: 



You have brought like a Spring — ^the dew; 
And the Gatherer of the hours, 
Prom the fairest dreams of the flowers, 

Will gather thoughts of you. 



75 



THE HOUSE OF DREAMS. 



VI. 



THE woods shall mourn, and Autumn, wan 
With maladies, shall go; 
The roses may forget their own 
Glad-heartedness, but O 

You came with Hope, and while to-day 

At eventide we stand, 
This pledge, your loveliest and last. 

Rests warmly in my hand ! 



76 



SEA SONGS. 



I. 



LOVE, look less wistfully out thro* the night ! 
Still as the whirling gold galaxies flee, 
Quelled with remembrance and wild with delight, 
Beats the strong heart of the sea. 

Yea, as the fierce wind arises and fills 

Pull of drenched foam, share a shelter with 
me 
Still while in darkness now calling the hills, 

Rings the great cry of the sea ! 



79 



• ( 



THE HOUSE OF DREAMS. 



II. 



ONE hour the year's great secret dwells. 
At Autumn's crimson close, 
Upon her murmurous lips and quells 
The passion of the rose. 

While in Thy veins of purest snow 

A sun-white fervency 
Runs riotous as from some slow 

Insistence of the sea. 



80 



-* * -J«' 




r'T 



M*. 



.-..,^,^-^ . . .-^,,^,. .-,^^. r _i/'-,T'*«r' 



SEA SONGS. 



HI. 



In Memoriam, 

BENEATH the stars one ocean sleeps 
In dreamless solitude, and one 
Croons as the Dawn from bright arms leaps 
Where nestled she against the sun. 

No longer comes an angel voice, 
An angel voice no longer goes, 

Nor bids the crimson woods rejoice, 
Nor wakes the wonder of the rose. 



81 



T 



"■ m '!■ 



CAPRICES. 



^ 



OBERON AND TITANIA. 



(Masgue) 



Robin GooDFai,i-ow. 

SiSBNUS. 

Fancy. 

SUNBBAM. 



moonught. 
Raindsop. 
Jack Frost. 
Zbphtk. 



Elves, Fairies, and Pixies. 
ScBNB. — Midnight in Arden Forest. 
The King and Queen of the Fairies discovered 
before an open space on canopied thrones of leaves 
and flowers, A bordering rivulet wandering out 
beneath the trees as over running laughter. The 
forest bathed in moonlight. Robin GoodfeUow 
approaches as 



— ^'■•-•' ■•- ' "K- ' i^mm^'^-s^figg^t^^^grr^^nc^gfmmrmgmmm 



THE HOUSE OF DREAMS. 

Prologub. 

Now raise conjectural fancies of a time 

When Nature, worn with dark and feverous hours, 

Resumes her quiet restfulness. All air 

Is hushed save where the far-off chanticleer 

ShriUy assails, across the meadow-farms, 

Some neighboring countryside. The oaks do 

muse; 
The drowsy alders sway — ^while trooping forth 
With Oberon and Queen Titania 
O'erskipping intervening oceans from 
The Thul6 caves, these elfin companies 
Adorn our moving pantomime as shapes 
And shadows of a maiden's fantasies. 
Antique, capricious, humorous and droll 
Embodied meanings, not unnatural 
Around the forest, gather into view; 
While slowly onward, as the spirits pass, 
Oblivion's smile attends a weary world 
Adown wide corridors of dreams and peace. . 

E/ves and Fairies appear dur- 
ing the prologiie and^ after a 
few measures^ disperse dimly 
among the trees. 



86 



V"«pe^ 



CAPRICES. 

Oberon. 

Aha! My leal, incony travelers, 
Come hither! 

Ali,. 
Alder-liefest Oberon! 

Obbron. 

As midnight creeps away, while' darkness veils 
The towering shoulders of the universe, 
Once more from viewless habitations far 
Away, while weaving dreams of happiness 
On soft, inviting pillows of repose 
In Greece and India, my starry host 
Of sympathizing little ones that soothe 
Misfortunes weeping over loneliness, 
All welcome once more to the bosky slopes 
Of Arden! 

TiTANIA. 

O Arden, where all the elves 
Of Klfland dwelt in happy days of yore, 
Bre the sweet Swan of Avon sailed away 
On shoreless seas of glory! 



87 






THE HOUSE OF DREAMS. 

SiRENUS. 

Ever since 
Then, Summer wanders sadly down the world 
As mourning over beautiful romance 
That is no more. The nights are empty now 
Of all midsummer dreams, and hunters on 
The elfin hills of Fancy far between. 

Fancy. 
Ah me, ah me! Since then! 

Obkron. 

Since then, truly 
The hurrah of the world bewilders those 
Who shuffle oflF the burr of gravity 

In Periodical forgetfulness 

Nathless, my tricksy revelers of night, 

All now take hands and merrily each sprite, 

Relating quaint adventures, toss a purse 

Of Fairy money to the universe 

Down yonder slumbering: the death of Mirth 

And burial of Joy was Sorrow's birth. 



88 






CAPRICES. 



All take hands y dancing mazy 
measures in the moonlight ^ and 
merrily troll the lullaby. 

High and low, rocking slow 

In their cradles airily, 
Rook and wren slumber when 

Over Arden warily 
We do wander down the night, 

To the left and to the right 
Wheeling O as we go 

Tripping onward fairily 
While Time fiddles merrily. 

Robin Goodfki^i^ow. 

Canes and crutches! PfF! A reeling measure 
For one so heavy. Tavern ingles! So. 

Oberon. 

A finger-length of immortality. 
Come hither, Fancy — now while yonder owl 
Grows hoarse declaiming in the wilderness 
At intervals, assail thy memory 



89 



THE HOUSE OF DREAMS. 

Or tame the whistling coursers of the air 
For swift conveyance to thy provinces. 
Whither away, most beauteous spirit? 

Fancy. 

Mounting always on some sky 
Voyage of discovery, 
As a falcon soars, to rule 
Quarries of the beautiful; 
Now on earth, then far away 
Through the flaming gates of day 
Into Paradise I dare 
Venture sailing over bare, 
Wind-walled turrets of the air 
^ Everywhere, everywhere. 

TiTANIA. 

Prithee, remember Lucifer! 

Obbron. 

And know 
Thy utmost power, for they fall indeed 
Who dwell among the stars. Aha, Sunbeam! 



90 



CAPRICES. 



Sunbeam. 

On some Oriental course 
Drifting down the universe, 
As a priest in summer bowers 
Gayly marrying the flowers, 
Or awakening with mirth 
Blossoms dreaming in the earth; 
While dissolving to explore. 
Warmly, every apple-core. 
Marshaling the clouds I soar 
Evermore, evermore. 

Obkron. 
A most warm-hearted fellow, so. 

Robin Goodfei,i.ow. 

A cross 
Between red-haired Apollo and his wise 
Old universal smile when Bacchus made 
Oblivion out of wine. Diana jumped 



91 



THE HOUSE OF DREAMS. 

i 

Across the Zodiac and fled before ! 

The reeling stars down Watling Street. 

TiTANIA. 

No more, 
Robin, no more! Wee minion of the moon, 
Come this way! Whither hast thou wandered all 
Night long amid the starry wilderness? 

M00NI.IGHT. 

Melancholy, sweet and lone 
As a vision, I have strown 
Silvery lilies on the grass 
Where all happy lovers pass 
Quickening the stars above 
All the earth with kisses of 
Passion and the queen of love. 

Ob^ron. 

Examine iiito this most carefully, 
Robin. Omit no detail, for the times 
Are dislocated certainly. 



92 



CAPRICES. 



Robin Goodfbi.i*ow. 

Ho, ho! 
No Mantuan swain need bawl for clemency 
To-morrow. 

Obbron. 

Well said. Hither, reveler! 

Raindrop. 

Ever> evening as each 
Of the little children reach 
Sleepytown almost, the fleet, 
Rainy patterings of feet. 
In the summer-time aloof 
Over attics, furnish proof 
Of the Fairies on the roof. 

Robin Goodfei*i*ow. 

Aha-ha! Rogues and rascals multiply 
As famously as mortals quarreling 
With Fortune. 



98 



THE HOUSE OF DREAMS. 



TiTANIA. 

All which shamefully deceives 
The melancholy Bishop on the verge 
Of hospitality when summer showers 
Delay unwary travelers. 

Obkron. 

Sessa! 
Cogs- wounds, enough! Assoil this icicle 
Before his shadow freezes on the ground. 

Robin Goodpkllow. 
Good-lack! 

Obbron. 

Out, out! Elbow the atmosphere, 
Robin, or study thy nativity 
With extreme heedfulness. An patience proves 
A weary mare, thy dignity will limp 
As painfully as modern pensioners 
Applying for a competence. 



94 



CAPRICES. 



In times 
Of peace, all scars are coinable. The wise 
Man with his honesty must cool 
Impatient heels before the reigning fbol, 
As the old adage paces. 

Robin Goodfki*i*ow. 

Honesty, 
Of wide acquaintance, meets with villainous, 
I^w, fat and greasy citizens among 
Corporeal multitudes. 

TiTANIA. 

Aha- ha! Views 
That smack of observation, but a most 
Threadbare philosophy. Hush, hush! A still, 
Small, rimy voice craves audience. 

Robin Goodf]5i,i.ow. 

Egad! 
A walking relic of antiquity. 



95 



THE HOUSE OP DREAMS. 



Jack Frost. 

Appearing to mortal view 

A translated drop of dew, 

Soldering rebellious years 

As with penitential tears, 

Many evenings on the ricks, 

While the scheming stars plan tricks 

Overhead to trip the day, 

Boreas and Frosty lay 

Dreaming winter-time away. 

Obbron. 

As worthy children of Medusa or 
Perhaps some petrified metonymy 
Delivered shivering. Uncommon things 
Have been discredited before. 



Robin Goodfbi*U)w. 

The most 
Improbable seem most probable. 



96 



CAPRICES. 



TiTANIA. 

More 
Reverence, good fellow! Midnight ambles on 
Impetuously. Before Aurora lays 
Her rosy fingers on the draperies 
Of Paradise, one and all fairily 
Follow Zephyr airily. 

Zkphyr. 

Over hills and dales I go 
Hither, thither, to and fro 
Even as a mystery 
In some wilderness of glee, 
All day long distributing 
Breezy songs the twittering 
Orioles and linnets sing. 

TiTANIA. 

A gracious spirit surely! 



97 



THE HOUSE OF DREAMS. 



Obbron. 

Ariel 
Arrayed in sorry pantomime or more 
Probably some imp of Nature. Nature 
Ever was as varying as the air 
Consoling Mother Maudlin. 

Robin Gc>odpei<ix)w. 

Fickleness 
Is a feminine virtue. Nothing more! 
For there, descending from the balcony 
Of yonder mountain summits visibly — 
Behold, behold once more across the hills 
Apollo walks down from the Orient! 
The slumbering universe awakes! Day, day 
Is at the door! 

Obbron. 
Away! 



98 



CAPRICES. 



TiTANIA. 

Away! 

Ai.1.. 

Away! 

As day breaks over the for est ^ 
the birds are heard singing and^ 
with a quaint device^ the spirits 
all mysteriously vanish. 



99 









rf 



'4 



^ : 



THE SISTERS. 

Night, in the chambered east. 
Sits with Dawn at the door. 

Dropped from her golden feast, 
Star-crumbs scatter the floor. 

Mice, from behind the sun, 

Patter along the sky; 
Nibbling the crumbs they run 

Touching with footprints shy. 

Echoes of purring sound 
Over the world below; 

Nothing more to be found. 
Scamper — away they go! 

100 






CAPRICES. 

Dawn, in the chambered east, 
Sits by an open door. 

Night has gone from the feast ; 
Barren of crumbs the floor. 



101 



AN UMBEI. FOR SPRING. 

Hear the Days come marching on 

Noon by noon, 
Stealing down the starry lawn 

All with boon, 
Laughing lips the sunlight presses 
As they shake their golden tresses 
Round the moon. 

Dawning human blushes race 

Everywhere and run 
Over many a rosy face, 
As the sun 
Rises and 
Fills the land 
With a warm and purple haze. 



102 



CAPRICES. 

Voices in the waters throng 
Once more chorusing a song 
All the happy elves are singing 

Far and near^ 
As the season passes winging 

Down the year. 

Perfumes seem forever flowing 
In sweet rivers through the air, 
While the elfin horns are blowing 
Everywhere: 
Even as the wind translates 
Into unknown tongues a lay^ 
Serenading 
Maiden Spring 
Paying toll at all the gates 
Where the caravans of May 
Strike their dewy, southern tents. 
Delicate with woven scents. 



103 



->* 



J - - L ^ 



<j 



( 



• < 



THE HOUSE OF DREAMS. 

Breaking camp 
With muted tramp; 
Marching nearer past the gleaming, 
Idle rivers southward dreaming 
Weird and quaintly; 
All so faintly 
Chanting unto Spring 
Songs that men may never sing. 

While the timid buds peep out 
Of the tents now pitched about 

In the grasses, 
Where the south-wind guards the passes, 
Breezy voices, unafraid in 
View of lofty 
Spirits, softly 
Murmur while the queenly maiden, 
Giving hostages of flowers 
To the golden, Circean hours, 
Passes near — 
Winging, winging, winging down the year. 

104 



INSCRIPTION. 

A wayside loiterer, it will be said, 

Who held in reverence the lowly flower; 

A wanderer, whose dreams were bread, 
While rovitig on to the last hour 

Of that inevitable evening, far away 
O where some mountain rivulet may tell 

Its pebbly rosaries! shall stay 
And wave to thee and wish thee well. 



THIS IS THE END OF 

THE HOUSE OF DREAMS 

WRITTEN BY WILLIAM GRIFFITH 

AND PRINTED BY 

THE HUDSON-KIMBERLY PUBLISHING CO. 

KANSAS CITY, U. S. A. 

IN JUNE, MDCCCXCIX.